Two Dragons Entwined on a Spray of Stylized Foliage | LACMA Collections

Two Dragons Entwined on a Spray of Stylized Foliage Turkey, about 1575 Paintings Ink, color washes, and gold on paper 7 x 3 in.

Livre d'art Le Cantique des oiseaux d'Attar illustré par la peinture en Islam d'orient - Éditions Diane de Selliers

Livre d'art Le Cantique des oiseaux d'Attar illustré par la peinture en Islam d'orient - Éditions Diane de Selliers

Bahram Gur slays lions (No. 68) and a dragon (No. 69) Ferdowsi, Shahnameh Safavid: Qazvin or Mashhad, 28 November 1580 Scribe: Qotb al-Din b. Hasan al-Tuni Opaque watercolour, ink and gold on paper Private collection

Bahram Gur slays lions (No. and a dragon (No. Ferdowsi, Shahnameh Safavid: Qazvin or Mashhad, 28 November 1580 Scribe: Qotb al-Din b. Hasan al-Tuni Opaque watercolour, ink and gold on paper Private collection

Folio from a Aja'ib al-makhluqat (Wonders of Creation) by al-Qazvini; recto: The Sea-Serpent/Dragon (al-Tannin); verso: Julka (Julka), Dolphin (Dulfin), Dhuiban (Dhu'iban), early 15th century, Iraq or Eastern Turkey

Folio from a Aja'ib al-makhluqat (Wonders of Creation) by al-Qazvini; recto: The Sea-Serpent/Dragon (al-Tannin); verso: Julka (Julka), Dolphin (Dulfin), Dhuiban (Dhu'iban), early century, Iraq or Eastern Turkey

The tradition of drawings of dragons derived from Chinese art took a root in Iran under Timurid and Turkman rule during the fifteenth century. Dragons were a popular subject for drawings in Ottoman Empire executed in the so-called saz style, named for the saz qalami, or reed pen. Drawing attributed to Shah Quli, a Persian who became a leading painter at the court of the Ottoman sultan Süleyman the Magnificent (r. 1520–66).

Ornamental drawing of a dragon, century; Ottoman Attributed to Shah Quli Turkey (Istanbul) Ink, colors, and gold on paper. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Age of Süleyman "the Magnificent" (r.

Sikandar kills dragon - Sikandar reaches the Land of the Narmpay, how he fights and is victorious, how he kills a Dragon, ascends a Mountain, and is forewarned of his own Death

A Double-sided leaf from a manuscript of Firdausi's Shahnameh: Rustam Killing the Dragon and Rustam about to kill the woman magician, signed by Mu'in Musavvir, Persia, Isfahan, late 17th century | lot | Sotheby's

A Double-sided leaf from a manuscript of Firdausi's Shahnameh: Rustam Killing the Dragon and Rustam about to kill the woman magician, signed by Mu'in Musavvir, Persia, Isfahan, late century

AN ILLUSTRATED AND ILLUMINATED LEAF FROM A MANUSCRIPT OF FIRDAUSI'S SHAHNAMEH: ISFANDYAR KILLS THE DRAGON, PERSIA, SAFAVID, 16TH CENTURY gouache heightened with gold on paper, 4 columns of text in black nasta'liq script, reverse with 21 lines of text written horizontally and diagonally, with a heading in red painting: 13.3 by 17.5cm. max. leaf: 29.6 by 19.3cm. Sotheby's

An illustrated and illuminated leaf from a manuscript of Firdausi's Shahnameh: Isfandyar Kills the Dragon, Persia, Safavid, century

No one but Rostam ever rides Rakhsh, and Rakhsh recognizes no one but Rostam as his master. Also, he is the only horse ever that Rostam could ride, since his great strength and weight would kill other horses. Image: Rakhsh y Rostam killing the dragon. Mid 16th Century, Shiraz. Now, in Harvard Museum.

From the Harvard Art Museums’ collections Rustam and Rakhsh Slay a Dragon, illustrated folio from a manuscript of the Shahnama by Firdawsi

Rustam's 3rd trial: killing the dragon (with the help of his horse Raksh). Illustration from Persian epic poem, Shahnama.

Rustam's trial: killing the dragon (with the help of his horse Raksh). Illustration from Persian epic poem, Shahnama.

LOT_98_ISKANDAR_FIGHTS_THE_DRAGON_A_PERSIAN_MINIATURE,_SHIRAZ,_CIRCA_1600.jpg (620×1055)

Lot 98 / Iskandar fights the dragon. A Persian miniature, Shiraz, / Courtesy of MILLON Auction House

Gushtasp slays the dragon. Illustration from Persian epic poem the Shahnama. 1450

Gushtasp slays the dragon. Illustration from Persian epic poem the Shahnama.

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