Medieval Recipes

Collection by Daniel Holdren

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Slow cooked beef cheeks in red wine sauce on creamy mashed potato

Slow Cooked Beef Cheeks in Red Wine Sauce

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162 reviews
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3.5 hours
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Recipe video above. These slow cooked beef cheeks are so meltingly tender that you can eat them with a spoon. And the sauce is so flavourful you'll want to drink it out of a cup! This recipe makes enough to serve 6 people, made with 6 small beef cheeks (or share 4 large ones). Leftovers are brilliant to freeze, or turn into a quick Ragu to toss through pasta or making a Pie!

Winter is coming... otra vez (medieval pork pie)
A FoodGood FoodFood And DrinkEntree RecipesEnglish Food

Winter is coming... otra vez (medieval pork pie)

(English version below ) La semana pasada cayó la primera nevada de la temporada. Llegó sin avisar, como casi siempre, provocando un ...

Manchet Breads were some of the best quality leaven breads eaten in Medieval and Tudor Britain. Yet bread like this, made of double boulted (sieved through a cloth) stoneground wheat was always the exception. For much of Britain’s history most bread baked was commonly made from a mixture of coarser flour, made from various grains …

Manchet Bread Recipe - OAKDEN

Manchet Breads were some of the best quality leaven breads eaten in Medieval and Tudor Britain. Yet bread like this, made of double boulted (sieved through a cloth) stoneground wheat was always the exception. For much of Britain’s history most bread baked was commonly made from a mixture of coarser flour, made from various grains …

Fried crackers, 14th-15th century England - ties in to Middle Ages history and Eli can help in kitchen

Cruste Rolle

Fried crackers, 14th-15th century England - ties in to Middle Ages history and Eli can help in kitchen

Straight to the recipe Medieval pasties with bone marrow In 2006 I acquired the book Bones by Australian chef de cuisine Jennifer McLagan. The front cover has a splendid picture of roasted marrow b…

Sluberkens

Straight to the recipe Medieval pasties with bone marrow In 2006 I acquired the book Bones by Australian chef de cuisine Jennifer McLagan. The front cover has a splendid picture of roasted marrow b…

Andreas Viestad's Chicken With Saffron and Cinnamon | Genius Kitchen

Andreas Viestad's Chicken With Saffron and Cinnamon Recipe - Food.com

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3 reviews
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50 minutes
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Another wonderful Andreas Viestad recipe, one of few for chicken. He adapted this one from a medieval Icelandic cookbook; the spices indicate that it probably was a dish for the wealthy. Amazingly, the amount of cinnamon is not overpowering here, and the dish is best with "skin-on" chicken. If you don't like chicken livers, substitute 1/2 chicken bouillon cube. Prep time includes a day of marinating (if you choose that option).

Quail Stew with ale and walnuts (Anglo Saxon)

Anglo-Saxon - Quail & Bacon Stew with Walnuts

Harleain MS 279 (ab. 1430) Henne in Bokenade - Stewed Chicken in Sauce - Another "Medieval Comfort Food"-tender chicken served in a sauce thickened with eggs and delicately flavored with salt, parsley, sage, nutmeg and ginger.  The non-sca taste testing teens argued over who would get to finish off the batch! A must serve for my next event.

Harleain MS 279 (ab. 1430) Henne in Bokenade - Stewed Chicken in Sauce

Hen in Bukenade The people of the middle ages enjoyed a much wider variety of foods then we do today. Some of the items that they enjoyed were particularly exotic, for example, peacocks, that would be cooked and then re-dressed in their own skin. Other food sources that they enjoyed are more familiar for example, chicken and chicken eggs. Domestication of chickens has a very long history. Bones possibly belonging to chickens have been dated to 5400 B.C. in China and there is some speculation…

Give it Forth: Harleian MS 279 Whyte wortes (~1430) Creamed Greens - Another comfort dish frome Harleian MS 279-- Tender cabbage and kale, creamed with almond milk thickened with rice flour, flavored with saffron, salt and a touch of honey.  A dish that is as delicious as it is beautiful to look at!

Harleian MS 279 Whyte wortes (~1430) White Wortes- Greens Creamed with Almond Milk

Whyte Wortes Whyte Wortes is the last in the series of vegetable pottages that do not include additional meat. I did not use the plethora of herbs for iij. Joutes which the recipe refers to, but instead chose to use the common greens referred to in .j. Lange Wortys de chare. Once again, we are instructed to boil the greens before adding them to the broth component, in this case, almond milk thickened with rice. Boiling the greens before adding them to the broth removes the bitter properties…

Medieval Manchet and Barley Bread

Medieval Manchet and Barley Bread

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Rastons. SCA, Medieval, Elizabethan/Tudor, Historic Cooking, Medieval Reenactment Recipes, Historic Food, Harleian Manuscripts

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) -- Rastons - A Fifteenth Century Bread-like substance that is a pastry

A loaf that has been baked and sliced into "sops" This month I have decided to focus on various sops and pottages from Harleian MS 279. Sops are thick slices of bread which have been soaked in liquid, usually a broth and then eaten. They were quite common during the period, yet we seldom see them featured at the banquets that are recreated in the SCA. An example of a modern day sop, would be the bread you find on top of french onion soup! Pottage is another word that can be used for a soup…

Manchet loaves were the most sought after bread of the time.  It was a pure white wheaten bread, and was the closest to the kind we eat today.

Ladie Graies Manchets (1594) and Robert Mays French Bread (1685)

Manchet Bread -three loaves from one recipe Can you imagine eating two to three pounds of bread a day? Or following it up with a gallon of ale? During the late medieval period, that was the standard ration of food given to individuals from nobility to castle garrisons. It is a staggering amount of bread to be eaten daily. Bread was an important staple of the medieval diet, in fact, it was the most basic and common element on every table. Bread could be produced as trenchers, which were used…

How to Cook: Medieval Legume Girdle Breads | Dublin Inquirer

How to Cook Medieval Legume Girdle Breads

In her monthly column, Maeve L’Estrange shares how to recreate medieval Irish recipes. What might people once have cooked with dried pea?