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Math Talk

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Math Talk. Get inspired and try out new things.

Did you know this trick?🤯 | Pinterest

Apr 13, 2021 - This Pin was created by The Extra Inspirer on Pinterest. Did you know this trick?🤯..

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Encouraging Student Self-Reflection - Math Coach's Corner

Student self-reflection and growth mindset go hand-in-hand. Model and teach reflection strategies, and reinforce with visual reminders.

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Pin by Estelle Gerber on classroom [Video] in 2021 | Pelajaran matematika, Buku catatan matematika, Fakta matematika

2021 Jun 26 - This Pin was discovered by Estelle Gerber. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest

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Let's build a better world together-one classroom at a time!

Today I wanted to share some ideas for students who need frequent reminds to stay on task, complete their work, and use safe hands and feet. During my first few years of teaching, I focused a LOT on positive relationships with my kids. That meant I really focused on the way I talked to my students. Instead of "sit down," I might say "Frankie, please sit on your bottom." Unfortunately, really quickly I became a broken record. During a read-aloud, I might say the same thing to the same kid 5 times. One time my administrator mentioned I might try non verbal reminders with one of my students. "I noticed you said his name a lot during your lesson." I think that was 8 years ago, and it really stuck with me. From that moment, I've come up with many ideas for supporting students without interrupting the flow of the lesson, and calling attention to them. Even if we are very kind and positive, it's still publicly correcting our students. All of these resources are available in my Behavior Survival Kit. Expectation Cards Picture reminders are so helpful to keep around our room and at our students' desks. I like to keep them small and on a ring, and we also use hang them on the walls. This sheet, for example, I'd keep by our whole group/carpet area. Instead of stopping a lesson and saying something, I could quickly point to the picture reminder. Of course, before we use these, we'd need to go over them with our students. You could also ask them to illustrate each expectation . Check in Cards Often when our students are struggling with their behavior, they may be overstimulated. They may need sensory input (running around, pushing others), or are overwhelmed. Taking a break is a great way for students to "recenter." This is NOT time-out. A break might look like sitting in a quiet corner with a stuffed animal, or even going to get a drink of water. Whatever you set up with your class is what your students should do when they see this card. If something is happening, and you know they need a break, you can discreetly pass this to them as a reminder. Hopefully, over time, they'll begin to recognize their own cues and can ask for it. Picture Reminders These are similar to the expectations cards, just a little more specific. I really like to keep these on a ring to show students individually. One example for use might be in the hallway. If you notice students putting their hands on each other, you could silently hold up the "safe hands" card or walk beside them and show it. Some teachers also choose to attach these to their whole group easel. Then, during lessons, you could quickly tap a reminder for students. Secret Symbol The final tip I have for you is creating a "secret signal" with your students. This would work especially well for a student that has specific behavior goals. For example, you might have a student that consistently shouts out. After talking with them about their goal, work with them to come up with a secret symbol. Ideally it would be something silly that would really get their attention. You might wiggle your ear, tap your nose, or even stick out your tongue. That student would know you are reminding them without calling attention to them. If you'd like to use any of these tools in your classroom, be sure to check out my Behavior Survival Kit. There are over 200 pages of resources for supporting your students with their behavior, and creating positive relationships with them.

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Dale S
Dale S saved to Children

Bulletin Board Tips & Tricks

I have a love/hate relationship with my bulletin boards! Some years they seem to come together nicely-- and other years they seem a disaster! Last year was tough because I only had 2 boards-- so I had to make a lot of bulletin board type areas on the bare walls of my room. This year-- I have about 5 boards-- and it came together nicely! Here are some of my favorite tips and tricks to getting a bulletin board you LOVE! Please note that this post contains some affiliate links for Amazon. One of my favorite trends going on right now is to add 3D elements to your board! This could be any range of items-- but most often I see: Banners and buntings. This editable pencil banner came from my writing bulletin board set-- found here. 3D Paper flowers 3D Succulents (The succulents on my welcome board below are super easy to make!) Decorative fans or poms These items do not have to be expensive-- and are usually homemade! I love the depth it gives a board! Sticking to a color scheme will add cohesion to your classroom decor! I usually try to do a uniform background paper on each board-- and then change up the trimmer. So even if you have a "rainbow" theme-- your eyes (and your students') aren't being overwhelmed by too many colors at once! My all time favorite bulletin board paper is the Pacon fadeless paper from Amazon! I bought this large roll and it went across 5 large bulletin boards (and I have more left). You can also find it at Michaels or teacher stores-- but the rolls on Amazon are the biggest! They have a chalkboard colored paper that looks amazing! Here are some of my bulletin boards-- my color scheme is the wood paper, blues, and green. This is such a simple way to save $ on those letter cutouts from the teacher store! Here is the process: Open PowerPoint (I like landscape view) Click the "Insert" tab at the top and select "text box". Drag the text box across your page. Type a letter you are needing and size it to about 500 (you can play with this sizing after changing the font) Choose a font you want-- remember that bolder fonts are easier to cut out by hand. Adjust text size again (if too large or small) Highlight the letter and click the "Format" tab at the top. Find "Text Fill" and make it white or "no fill" Find "Text Outline" and change it to black. While under the text outline option-- find "weight" and choose the heaviest option (I usually do 6 pt) Copy & Paste your letter-- then change it to the next letter you need. Right click the slide and select "duplicate" then change out more letters. Print on any color you prefer! Here is my math bulletin board with homemade letters for a title: I always try to make a board for each topic I teach. This year I'm departmentalized. So I will have a board for math anchor charts and writing work (my 2 topics). One year I had a word wall, but I always forgot it was there-- so my students never used it. I have also put up center rotation boards and never used it. Think it over BEFORE you hang it up. If it can wait until after school begins-- wait. I ended up doing my math rotations via my smartboard (it was easier to switch the groups around). Here is an example of my writing board-- I also have class numbers on clothespins-- so the students and I can move their clips on the pencil chart to where they are in the writing process: Also, try to find things that are relevant to today's culture. A place to "tweet" about their favorite books or "Instagram" something cool they've done or learned today. They will love these boards! My last tip is perhaps the most important:Your bulletin boards DO NOT have to be full before the first day of school. In fact, it's best they aren't. Give them a place to showcase their work. If you're doing anchor charts-- leave places to hang them up! If you're all about that growth mindset or data growth boards-- wait until you've taught the students about it and THEN hang something up. They will be MUCH more likely to look at a board they helped create than a poster you printed and hung before school started. Trust me. I hope you learned some new tricks today! Don't be afraid to leave it plain Jane for awhile :)

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Monday Made It: July 8th

Not a lot of school made - its this week, but I did get a nifty math anchor chart and some new labels for my work station bins done. ...

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Math Workshop "Math Talk" bookmarks

Our students have a lot to say, but talking about math can be scary, especially when you don't know how to start the conversation! Math Talk in my classroom greatly improved after implementing these bookmarks and practice sheets into my classroom! Help your own students become master mathematicians...

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