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Paper Pieced Quilt

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Paper Pieced Quilt. Get inspired and try out new things.

How to Sew Hexies Together Quilting Tutorial

Welcome to the second installment of my hexie mug rug tutorial! If you’re new to quilting or English paper piecing this is a great t...

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How to English Paper Piece Diamonds

Shop Diamonds & Variations at your favorite quilt store for all things EPP- Paper Pieces®

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Upcoming!

It has been a busy sick week in our house so that's why I have been MIA! Sorry!! New posts to come soon: 1. Finished modern constellations quilt top!! 2. I decided to add a star to the top corner of the quilt 3. I haven't figured out if I want to paper piece or applique the star.... 4. I used more left over curtain fabric for a new ironing board cover! Lots of pictures coming soon..... Here is the star I want to use for the quilt Any preferences, paper piece or applique? I know it is a paper piece pattern but if I applique it I will just use the general shape as a guide.

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how to make a pineapple block (without paper piecing!)

Thank you all SO MUCH for your kind words about my pineapple blocks. I've been working on them off and on for a few months and it's fun to finally share them with you! I LOVE my quilt so far...and just like I had hoped, it keeps getting better as I add to it! Here's a photo heavy tutorial for you so you can make a pineapple block (or 20!) of your very own. Cut a 2.5" square for the center. Cut another 2.5" square in a contrasting color. Cut the contrasting square in half on the diagonal once to make 2 half square triangles. Arrange the pieces as shown. Sew pieces together and press. Trim off dog ears and cut two more triangles to add to the center piece. These will need to be slightly larger than the first set of triangles. Sew second set of triangles to center piece and press. Trim up the piece to form a square. Cut two strips of light fabric. These strips are 1.25" wide. Varying the width of strips throughout the block is a good idea (I used strips between 1.25" to 1.75" wide throughout)....HOWEVER....I suggest adding the same width of strips on each round. So, all the lights added to this round should be 1.25" wide. Sew the strips to the block and press. Add two more light strips. The width of these strips should match the width of the strips in the previous step. (In this case, 1.25" wide.) The goal is to keep your block as square as possible. Sew and press. Trim off the triangles as shown. Use your ruler to make the cuts 90 degrees from the center square. Discard the triangles. (Can you believe it? I actually threw them away!) The piece should look like this when it is trimmed up. Cut a round of dark strips. These are all 1.5" wide. Again, the width of the strips for each round should be consistent. Sew and press. Trim off the triangle ends. Do you see how the block isn't quite square? No worries. Just trim a sliver. That little sliver makes a big difference later on. Add two more light fabrics to the sides. And two more light fabrics the to top and bottom. Trim the triangle corners once again. And add another round. Sew and press. Trim. Add another round. Trim. Add another round, trim. You get the idea! Once the block measures 16" from side to side and 16" from top to bottom, it's time to add the corners. Align the block on a cutting mat and measure the size of triangle needed to fill in the corner. The measurements here were about 5 3/4", so I added 1". I cut a square 6 3/4" and cut it in half once on the diagonal. Measure and cut the triangles for the remaining two sides. Sew all the corners on and press. Trim up the block to 16" square. A few things to note: I varied the strips in the block from 1.25" wide to 1.75" wide. I think this adds a lot of interest to the quilt! It is harder to predict the final size when you are "building" the block, but once you make one or two, you will surely get the hang of it. These blocks can be made any size...I started with 14" blocks but bumped up the size to 16" after I made a few. This seems to be an ideal size for this strip width and 20 blocks will make a perfectly sized lap quilt. Keep an eye on your values (lights and darks), so the pattern emerges and is consistent throughout. These babies take TIME! I think each block takes me a few hours. (Totally worth it, though!) This is my favorite...the more scraps the better! Here's a progress shot. I've got 9 done so far! The one in the middle right is on point. That was a mistake, but I love what it adds to the quilt! If you have questions, I'll try to answer them in the comments. Happy scrap sewing!

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Eternity Knot quilt block, instant download paper piecing quilt patterns, PDF quilt pattern, celtic knot quilt patterns, endless knot

The Eternity Knot PAPER PIECED quilt block pattern has instructions & clearly labeled foundation pattern sections to sew 6 inch (15.25 cm) and 12 inch blocks in both square and on-point versions. For other sizes, the handy percentages chart will guide you in enlarging or reducing the pattern as needed. You can explore color schemes before choosing your fabric using the coloring page included. Both the PDF quilt pattern and a basic paper piecing tutorial are instantly downloadable upon payment completion. The pattern is written in ENGLISH. While the Eternity Knot quilt block is not particularly difficult to sew, it contains numerous sections and is recommended for those with prior paper piecing experience. This design is also available as a pattern written for rotary-cutting and standard piecing techniques, great for making larger-size Eternity Knots: http://etsy.me/1ub5Csb This fascinating and old endless knot pattern is known by several other names, including Infinity Knot, Endless Knot, and Buddhist Knot, and variations of it appear in decorative arts around the world. By any name, it makes a wonderful a central medallion in a wall-hanging or table runner for a meditation corner. For a beautifully symbolic ring bearer pillow or wedding album cover, stitch an Eternity Knot quilt block in pale, romantic fabrics. Rotary cut & pieced Eternity Knot pattern: http://etsy.me/1ub5Csb More Celtic knot patterns: http://etsy.me/1aVYNyt Main shop page: www.etsy.com/shop/PieceByNumberQuilts You might also enjoy the Yin and Yang quilt block pattern: http://etsy.me/18k2jk4 The Eternity Knot quilt pattern and accompanying instructions and illustrations are copyrighted by Piece By Number, and may not be further distributed, shared or reproduced by any means without my prior permission. You may sew items from this pattern to sell on a small-scale commercial basis (i.e. no mass production). Please credit Piece By Number as pattern designer. If you're interested in teaching a class with my patterns, my policies page gives information on terms and volume discounts or please contact me via Etsy message.

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New FREE Quilt Software!!!

Two Christmases ago hubby bought me Quilt Design Wizard from the same people who give you EQ. Now, I love this software. It's cool that you ...

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Lisa Otto
Lisa Otto saved to Lilly

Starbright progress

Finally got the time to work on the Book of the Month project, which I'm calling Starbright. The block is called Carolyn's block from Carol Doak's 40 Bright and Bold Paper Pieced Blocks, (affiliate link) and boy, is it bright! But I think it's going to look awesome, even before the quilting! So, here's the start, with all the pieces ready to go, and some pieces sewn on the paper. I have to admit that I used the freezer paper technique on this one, just so I could compare it to the traditional sew-through-the-paper technique. If your not familiar with freezer paper piecing, here's a quick tutorial. A big roll of freezer paper is found in places such as Target, Walmart, the grocery store etc. When taking it off the roll, I iron it lightly, because it does shrink. Doing this helps the blocks from ending up a bit too small. I cut the paper into 8 1/2" x 11" pieces to print foundation patterns from EQ7. I use an inkjet printer to print on the dull side and have had no problems putting freezer paper through. Before starting any project, I always print a test block to check the measurements of the block. I know that my printer makes the length short, but I compensate for that by adding .05 to my block height measurement when setting up the block size to print in EQ7. Once your blocks are the correct size, print away! Remember to check the 'mirror' button because the sewing happens on the other side of the printout, which is the mirror image of the block. Sometimes that matters, and other times it doesn't--just double check that mirror button! Now for the fun part--sewing! Set the iron to a temperature that is warm enough for the fabric to stick to the freezer paper, but not extremely hot. Starting with the first piece and the freezer paper shiny side up, lightly tack down the fabric with the iron tip, avoiding contact between the iron and the shiny paper. Be sure to leave a seam allowance on all sides. Turn the unit over and fully iron down the piece. Hold it up to the light to double check the area is covered and there is ample seam allowance. (And yes, I know I didn't follow the number sequence here!) Using a cardstock or a postcard as a straight edge, fold on the line for the next piece. Keeping the paper folded, place a 1/4" ruler on the fold edge and trim the seam allowance to 1/4". Line up the seam allowance edge with the next piece of fabric. At the sewing machine, with the freezer paper side up, place the needle just to the right of the fold. If you find the foot is dragging on the folded back (shiny side) piece of freezer paper, place a plain piece of paper over it for the foot to ride on. Using a 2.0-2.2mm stitch length, stitch beside the fold. Open up the fold, and from the fabric side, press the seam and lightly press the new piece into place. Flip the unit over and press the paper completely onto the fabric. To finish the block, continue folding on the seamline, trimming the seam allowance, sewing the next piece, and pressing the new piece into place on the freezer paper. And the result is a pretty block! Hope you have enjoyed this lesson and give paper piecing a try, either with the freezer paper method, or the sew through method. Either way, I highly recommend Carol Doak's books, and especially her Mastering Foundation Paper Piecing at Blueprint.com. Carol does an awesome job with hints and tricks to make the whole process easy! Happy Quilting!

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Scrappy Pinwheel in a Square

Scrappy Pinwheel in a Square. Three challenges in one! I'm so excited to share this new block with you all! Making a pinwheel block is a challenge, but then so is a square in a square block, - cutting all those extra triangles and then getting them lined up. More often than not these blocks would need squaring up as well, creating an extra challenge. Well this is super easy! There are no triangles to cut. I've bypassed these issues to bring you a new way of construction. This is a terrific block for scraps. You can use any kind

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