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How to play chess

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For Jefferson, living with his grandchildren was a pleasure. Mrs. Smith reported that "he seemed delighted in delighting them," and noted that "while I sat looking at him playing with these infants, one standing on the sopha with its Profile of Francis Wayles Eppes as a young boy round his neck, the other two youngest on his knees, playing with him, I could scarcely realize that he was one of the most celebrated men now living, both as a Politician and Philosopher." Jefferson was an involved grandfather, teaching Ellen how to play chess, buying Virginia a guitar, and sharing the delights of the flower garden with Anne. Granddaughter Ellen Wayles Randolph remembered: "He took pains to correct our errors and false ideas, checked the bold, encouraged the timid, and tried to teach us to reason soundly and feel rightly. . . . He was watchful over our manners, and called our attention to every violation of propriety. He did not interfere with our education . . . except by advising us what studies to pursue, what books to read, and by questioning us on the books which we did read."    Mrs. Smith concluded her account of the family's breakfast by noting that the children "eat at the family table, but are in such excellent order, that you would not know, if you did not see them, that a child was present. After breakfast . . . it was the habit of the family each separately to pursue their occupations . . . . Mrs. Randolph withdrew to her nursery and excepting the hours housekeeping requires she devotes the rest to her children, whom she instructs." How To Play Chess, What Book, Manners, Infants, Grandchildren, Housekeeping, Books To Read, Virginia, Presidents
Our Breakfast Table
For Jefferson, living with his grandchildren was a pleasure. Mrs. Smith reported that "he seemed delighted in delighting them," and noted that "while I sat looking at him playing with these infants, one standing on the sopha with its Profile of Francis Wayles Eppes as a young boy round his neck, the other two youngest on his knees, playing with him, I could scarcely realize that he was one of the most celebrated men now living, both as a Politician and Philosopher." Jefferson was an involved grandfather, teaching Ellen how to play chess, buying Virginia a guitar, and sharing the delights of the flower garden with Anne. Granddaughter Ellen Wayles Randolph remembered: "He took pains to correct our errors and false ideas, checked the bold, encouraged the timid, and tried to teach us to reason soundly and feel rightly. . . . He was watchful over our manners, and called our attention to every violation of propriety. He did not interfere with our education . . . except by advising us what studies to pursue, what books to read, and by questioning us on the books which we did read." Mrs. Smith concluded her account of the family's breakfast by noting that the children "eat at the family table, but are in such excellent order, that you would not know, if you did not see them, that a child was present. After breakfast . . . it was the habit of the family each separately to pursue their occupations . . . . Mrs. Randolph withdrew to her nursery and excepting the hours housekeeping requires she devotes the rest to her children, whom she instructs."