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A Jew and a medical doctor, the Auschwitz prisoner Miklos Nyiszli - No. A8450 - was spared death for a grimmer fate: to perform autopsies and 'scientific research' on his fellow inmates at Auschwitz under the supervision of Dr. Josef Mengele, the chief provider for the gas chambers. Miraculously, Nyiszli survived to give an horrifying and sobering account, one of the first books to bring the full horror of the Nazi death camps to the public - Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eyewitness Account.

A Jew and a medical doctor, the Auschwitz prisoner Miklos Nyiszli - No. A8450 - was spared death for a grimmer fate: to perform autopsies and 'scientific research' on his fellow inmates at Auschwitz under the supervision of Dr. Josef Mengele, the chief provider for the gas chambers. Miraculously, Nyiszli survived to give an horrifying and sobering account, one of the first books to bring the full horror of the Nazi death camps to the public - Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eyewitness Account.

how horrible. An unburned hand emerging from an oven serves as a stark reminder that death and horror were just as rampant at smaller camps, such as the one at Stutthof, where this picture was taken, as they were at the more famous camps such as Auschwitz and Buchenwald.

how horrible. An unburned hand emerging from an oven serves as a stark reminder that death and horror were just as rampant at smaller camps, such as the one at Stutthof, where this picture was taken, as they were at the more famous camps such as Auschwitz and Buchenwald.

Funny Pictures Of The Day – 91 Pics

Funny Pictures Of The Day – 91 Pics

Camera found in an old vacated building after a couple of friends went on a ghost hunting expedition and never returned. The film was processed. This was the last pic taken on the roll.

Camera found in an old vacated building after a couple of friends went on a ghost hunting expedition and never returned. The film was processed. This was the last pic taken on the roll.

Until the mid-60s, the Aborigines came under the Flora And Fauna Act, which classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aborigine meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.

Until the mid-60s, the Aborigines came under the Flora And Fauna Act, which classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aborigine meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.