Ancient Greek sculpture

Collection by Sire Sasa • Last updated 4 days ago

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Sire Sasa
Laconia
Geometric period (900–700 BCE)
Archaic period (700 – 480 BCE)
Classical period (480 – 323 BCE)
Hellenistic period (323 – 30 BCE)
Archaic funerary stelai
Classical funerary stelai
Hellenistic funerary stelai
Magna Graecia
Crete
Cypro-Archaic (700–475 BCE)
Cypro-Classical (475–323 BCE)
Cypro-Hellenistic (323–58 BCE)
East Greek (Anatolia, Near-East)
East Greek (Bactria, Central Asia)
Other Pins

Laconia

Bronze mirror with a support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror with a support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror with a support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of an archer | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of an archer | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of an archer | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Ivory figurines representing xoanon of Orthia. From the sanctuary of Artemis Orthia in Laconia. 700–600 bce.

THE MASKS OF ORTHIA: FORM, FUNCTION AND THE ORIGINS OF THEATRE

Welcome to Cambridge Core

Orthian masks (from Carter 1987, 90 fig. 3-4).

Orthian masks (from Carter 1987, 90 fig. 3-4).

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

spartan ivory plate – Google-haku

spartan ivory plate – Google-haku

Carved ivory pin from Sparta. Archaic Period, 600s bce. The winged goddess holding birds or lions is usually identified as Artemis, but the qualities of goddesses in the archaic period are often interchangeable. The feathered headdress is a trait of Hera, for example. Ortheia came to be designated as Artemis Ortheia, but not by the Spartans.

Goddesses and Rites

Carved ivory pin from Sparta. Archaic Period, 600s bce. The winged goddess holding birds or lions is usually identified as Artemis, but the qualities of goddesses in the archaic period are often interchangeable. The feathered headdress is a trait of Hera, for example. Ortheia came to be designated as Artemis Ortheia, but not by the Spartans.

Geometric period (900–700 BCE)

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Archaic period (700 – 480 BCE)

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Classical period (480 – 323 BCE)

mourning athena relief – Google-haku

mourning athena relief – Google-haku

Hellenistic period (323 – 30 BCE)

Piraeus Artemis B. Found in 1959. Both Artemis statues are thought to be Hellenistic due to the hairstyle and stance, and both show a full-bodied Artemis with a long skirt that covers her legs. While the Artemis A figure is similar to the others in the collection and larger than life, the Artemis B statue is somewhat smaller than life-size. Archaeological Museum of Praeus in Athens.

Bronze statue of Artemis

Explore MariPanda's photos on Flickr. MariPanda has uploaded 2544 photos to Flickr.

Piraeus Artemis A. Found in 1959. Both Artemis statues are thought to be Hellenistic due to the hairstyle and stance, and both show a full-bodied Artemis with a long skirt that covers her legs. While the Artemis A figure is similar to the others in the collection and larger than life, the Artemis B statue is somewhat smaller than life-size. Archaeological Museum of Praeus in Athens.

Piraeus Artemis A. Found in 1959. Both Artemis statues are thought to be Hellenistic due to the hairstyle and stance, and both show a full-bodied Artemis with a long skirt that covers her legs. While the Artemis A figure is similar to the others in the collection and larger than life, the Artemis B statue is somewhat smaller than life-size. Archaeological Museum of Praeus in Athens.

This Hellenistic satyr wears a rustic perizoma (loincloth) and carries a pedum (shepherd's crook). Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

This Hellenistic satyr wears a rustic perizoma (loincloth) and carries a pedum (shepherd's crook). Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Archaic funerary stelai

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Classical funerary stelai

Greek tombstone

Greek tombstone

Funerary stele of Mnesarete; a young servant (left) is facing her dead mistress. Attica, circa 380 BC. (Glyptothek, Munich, Germany)

Collective History

A little bit about everything

Marble stele (grave marker) of a woman Period: Late Classical Date: ca. 375–350 B.C. Culture: Greek, Attic

Marble stele (grave marker) of a woman | Greek, Attic | Late Classical | The Met

The incomplete inscription makes clear that the seated woman is the daughter of a man from the deme (political district) of Sounion in Attica; the standing woman is named Philte.

Hellenistic funerary stelai

Funerary naiskos (Greek: ναΐσκος, diminutive of ναός "temple") of Aristonautes from the Kerameikos, ca. 330–310 BCE. marble, h. 2.91m.

Funerary naiskos (Greek: ναΐσκος, diminutive of ναός "temple") of Aristonautes from the Kerameikos, ca. 330–310 BCE. marble, h. 2.91m.

Gravestone of a seven year old Greek girl named Apollonia depicting stroking a dove, the symbol of the soul, and holding a pomegranate, an attribute of Persephone, goddess of the Underworld about 300 BCE | This gravestone is also made in Athens.

Gravestone of a seven year old Greek girl named Apollonia depicting stroking a dove, the symbol of the soul, and holding a pomegranate, an attribute of Persephone, goddess of the Underworld about 300 BCE

This gravestone is also made in Athens. Photographed at the Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades, California.

Magna Graecia

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Crete

Large clay female figurine with helmet, dedicated to the sanctuary of Gortyna. The hand posture indicates that she held shild and spear, in the type of Athena Promachos, the goddess of wisdom and war. Crete, Gortyna, Archaic period, 7th. cent. BCE. Crete, Iraklion, AMI

Large clay female figurine with helmet, dedicated to the sanctuary of Gortyna. The hand posture indicates that she held shild and spear, in the type of Athena Promachos, the goddess of wisdom and war. Crete, Gortyna, Archaic period, 7th. cent. BCE. Crete, Iraklion, AMI

Cypro-Archaic (700–475 BCE)

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Cypro-Classical (475–323 BCE)

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Cypro-Hellenistic (323–58 BCE)

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East Greek (Anatolia, Near-East)

Oil flask (aryballos) in the form of a bust of Medusa Greek, East Greek Archaic Period 600–570 B.C. Place of Manufacture: Greece, Rhodes

Oil flask (aryballos) in the form of a bust of Medusa

This aryballos takes the form of a monstrous gorgon. The gorgon’s hair falls around her shoulders, painted dark red against the pale orange of her skin. Snakes rendere …

East Greek (Bactria, Central Asia)

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Other Pins

Large clay female figurine with helmet, dedicated to the sanctuary of Gortyna. The hand posture indicates that she held shild and spear, in the type of Athena Promachos, the goddess of wisdom and war. Crete, Gortyna, Archaic period, 7th. cent. BCE. Crete, Iraklion, AMI

Large clay female figurine with helmet, dedicated to the sanctuary of Gortyna. The hand posture indicates that she held shild and spear, in the type of Athena Promachos, the goddess of wisdom and war. Crete, Gortyna, Archaic period, 7th. cent. BCE. Crete, Iraklion, AMI

Bronze mirror with a support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror with a support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror with a support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Bronze mirror support in the form of a nude girl | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a horseman | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of an archer | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of an archer | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of an archer | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Lead figure of a man with a spear or scepter | Greek, Laconian | Archaic | The Met

Ivory figurines representing xoanon of Orthia. From the sanctuary of Artemis Orthia in Laconia. 700–600 bce.

THE MASKS OF ORTHIA: FORM, FUNCTION AND THE ORIGINS OF THEATRE

Welcome to Cambridge Core

Orthian masks (from Carter 1987, 90 fig. 3-4).

Orthian masks (from Carter 1987, 90 fig. 3-4).

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

Hoplite statuette from Sparta.

spartan ivory plate – Google-haku

spartan ivory plate – Google-haku

Carved ivory pin from Sparta. Archaic Period, 600s bce. The winged goddess holding birds or lions is usually identified as Artemis, but the qualities of goddesses in the archaic period are often interchangeable. The feathered headdress is a trait of Hera, for example. Ortheia came to be designated as Artemis Ortheia, but not by the Spartans.

Goddesses and Rites

Carved ivory pin from Sparta. Archaic Period, 600s bce. The winged goddess holding birds or lions is usually identified as Artemis, but the qualities of goddesses in the archaic period are often interchangeable. The feathered headdress is a trait of Hera, for example. Ortheia came to be designated as Artemis Ortheia, but not by the Spartans.

Funerary naiskos (Greek: ναΐσκος, diminutive of ναός "temple") of Aristonautes from the Kerameikos, ca. 330–310 BCE. marble, h. 2.91m.

Funerary naiskos (Greek: ναΐσκος, diminutive of ναός "temple") of Aristonautes from the Kerameikos, ca. 330–310 BCE. marble, h. 2.91m.

Oil flask (aryballos) in the form of a bust of Medusa Greek, East Greek Archaic Period 600–570 B.C. Place of Manufacture: Greece, Rhodes

Oil flask (aryballos) in the form of a bust of Medusa

This aryballos takes the form of a monstrous gorgon. The gorgon’s hair falls around her shoulders, painted dark red against the pale orange of her skin. Snakes rendere …

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