16th century long-sleeved robe with tulip design Topkapi Saray Museum Istanbul

Ottoman long-sleeved robe with a tulip design, tailored in Turkey from imported Italian silk velvet, second half century.

Ottoman, caftan from 16th century

Sultan's caftan silk caftan from century (Museum Topkapi, Istanbul)

Ceremonial caftan made for Sehzade Mehmed, 2nd quarter of 16th century. Museum Topkapi (Istanbul)

Ottoman ceremonial man caftan made for Sehzade Mehmed, quarter of century.

Caftan with short sleeves (back) believed to belong to Osman II (1618-22). Velvet stitches on gold cloth with blue velvet decoration and stylized lotus pattern. 17 century.

Ceremonial caftan associated with Osman II Velvet stitches on gold cloth with blue velvet decoration and stylized lotus pattern.

Early 16th Century Kaftanlar, Entari information, what was period, and what is not.

PDF version of a handout on types of bellydance costumes and Middle Eastern garb you see in the SCA. Included are steps one can take to to make a wardrobe more period.

Late 16th cent young man's caftan. Ottoman.

Ottoman Young man's caftan with short sleeves (back) associated with Ahmet I. Red silk decorated with floral pattern, late century.

“I know a 'face' where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine.” William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream | Helena Nelson Reed

Helen Nelson-Reed ~ Visionary Watercolor painter

Fig. 202. Caftan. Istanbul. Mid-16th century. Polychrome silk and gilt-metal thread. A ceremonial caftan made of silk textiles made for the Ottoman court. The floral motifs are similar to those found in tiles. This is an example of the intricate saz design used in silk textile, probably worn by Suleyman’s son Bayezid. Interestingly, there is no way to fasten the front, causing the wearer to have to remain still while wearing it. pg. 378

Polychrome silk and gilt-metal thread. A ceremonial caftan made of silk textiles made for the Ottoman court. The floral motifs are similar to those found in tiles. Page Islamic Arts.

Pinterest
Search