Tugba Tekben
More ideas from Tugba
Building designs for passive daylighting – from the article “10 Stages to a Passive Solar Building from Design to Build” | Sustainable Cities Collective, 8 December 2014

Building designs for passive daylighting – from the article Stages to a Passive Solar Building from Design to Build”

Hexagon homes are more logical, save space when interlocking to each other, and promote harmony with the natural world (squares dont often occur in nature hexagons do)

,Hexagon homes are more logical, save space when interlocking to each other, and promote harmony with the natural world (squares dont often occur in nature hexagons

Passive cooling & heating, I especially like the concept of adding humidity through a conservatory:

Passive cooling & heating, unique for such a diagram to include a conservatory area. Indoor gardens, wall gardens, conservatory areas etc have a huge role to play in eco-friendly design.

Natural illumination.  Of course, this all depends where you live and what your window orientation is.  At my latitude, I don't have to worry about not getting enough solar penetration into a room because at mid-winter, the sunlight penetrates almost 5 metres.

Diagrams shows a room that using light shelves to create a bright area, as well as allows natural sun light to fall on the other side of the room. The diagrams also show light shelves being used to direct passive light inside the room.

Ant-house by mA-style Architects

From Remodelista Plywood cabinets In Japan, mA-style Architects designed a double-layered house where the exterior layer is used as a zone for closets and storage. Photograph by Kai Nakamura via mA-style Architects.

Tokyo Apartment by Sou Fujimoto Architect Sou Fujimoto devised multi-unit housing by literally stacking house-shaped units one atop the other. The topmost units are accessed by exterior staircases,.