Persian manuscript painting - noted margin proportions - noted use of lightness instead of dark  for depth The first human and the King of Iranians (Kiumartha)

Persian manuscript painting - noted margin proportions - noted use of lightness instead of dark for depth

The story of Haftvad and the worm, folio from Shahnameh of Shah Tahmasp (Date: 1540 Place: Tabriz, Iran Materials: Opaque watercolour, gold, ink, paper)

Folio From The Shahnama Of Shah Tahmasp: The Story Of Haftvad & The Worm Geography Iran Period Safavid, circa 1540 CE Dynasty Safavid Materials and technique watercolor, gold, ink/paper 47 x cm

Lot 98 / Iskandar fights the dragon. A Persian miniature, Shiraz, c.1600 / Courtesy of MILLON Auction House

Lot 98 / Iskandar fights the dragon. A Persian miniature, Shiraz, / Courtesy of MILLON Auction House

The Battle between Bahram Chubina and Sava Shah, Page from a Manuscript of the Shahnama (Book of Kings) of Firdawsi Iran, Shiraz, circa 1560 Opaque watercolor heightened with gold and silver on paper Mat: 30 1/4 x 22 1/4 in. (76.835 x 56.515 cm); 16 11/16 x 10 5/8 in. (42.42 x 26.92 cm) LACMA Collections

The Battle between Bahram Chubina and Sava Shah (image 1 of Iran, Shiraz, circa 1560

An illustrated and illuminated leaf from a manuscript of Firdausi's Shahnameh: The King of Mazandaran Turns into a Rock, Transoxiana, Shaybanid, 16th century

An illustrated and illuminated leaf from a manuscript of Firdausi's Shahnameh: The King of Mazandaran Turns into a Rock, Transoxiana, Shaybanid, century

Single Page from a Shah-Namah Medium: Ink, gouache colors on parchment paper Dates: 17th Century

Single Page from a Shah-Namah Medium: Ink, gouache colors on parchment paper Dates: Century

Rustam fights Afrasiyab, Human, Turanian Shahnama, 1085/1674 Princeton Islamic MSS., no. 58G

Rustam fights Afrasiyab, Human, Turanian Shahnama, 1085/1674 Princeton Islamic MSS., no. 58G

Rustam mourns Suhrab Shahnama Princeton Islamic MSS., no. 56G

Rustam mourns Suhrab Shahnama Princeton Islamic MSS., no. 56G

برگی از شاهنامه فردوسی، پادشاهی گیومرث،1560 میلادی، شیراز Miniature from a copy of Firdawsi’s Shah-nama. “The Court of Gayumart” Iran, Shiraz; c. 1560 Leaf: 42.5 × 27 cm Gayumart was the first of Iran’s mythical kings. Under his rule, men learned to clothe themselves in animal skins, but otherwise lived in harmony with their four-legged fellow creatures. The idyll was shattered when Ahriman, the symbol of evil, sent his son, the Black Div, to conquer Iran. Gayumart’s son, Siyamak, goes…

Miniature from a copy of Firdawsi’s Shah-nama. “The Court of Gayumart” Iran, Shiraz;

The fables owe their origin to India where they are best known in Sanskrit as the Panchatantra, but it was largely through the Arabic translation by Ibn al-Muqaffāʻ (died c. 757) that they became so popular in Persian. The story describes how the Sasanian king of Iran, Anushirvan (Khusraw I, r. 531-579), heard of a book treasured by the kings of India which had been compiled from the speech of animals, birds, reptiles and wild beasts.

The fables owe their origin to India where they are best known in Sanskrit as the Panchatantra, but it was largely through the Arabic translation by Ibn al-Muqaffāʻ (died c. 757) that they became so popular in Persian. The story describes how the Sasanian king of Iran, Anushirvan (Khusraw I, r. 531-579), heard of a book treasured by the kings of India which had been compiled from the speech of animals, birds, reptiles and wild beasts.

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